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Robert Charles Rennert1, Medhi Khani2, Kevin Thomas2, Thomas W. Morris2, Analiz Rodriguez3, J. D. Day2
  1. Department of Neurosurgery, Robert Charles Rennert, La Jolla, California, United States.
  2. Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Arkansas, United States.
  3. Department of Neurosurgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States.

Correspondence Address:
Robert Charles Rennert
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Arkansas, United States.

DOI:10.25259/SNI_776_2020

Copyright: © 2021 Surgical Neurology International This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Robert Charles Rennert1, Medhi Khani2, Kevin Thomas2, Thomas W. Morris2, Analiz Rodriguez3, J. D. Day2. Transsulcal parafascicular brain path-assisted approach to subcortical lesions: 2-dimensional operative video. 17-Mar-2021;12:107

How to cite this URL: Robert Charles Rennert1, Medhi Khani2, Kevin Thomas2, Thomas W. Morris2, Analiz Rodriguez3, J. D. Day2. Transsulcal parafascicular brain path-assisted approach to subcortical lesions: 2-dimensional operative video. 17-Mar-2021;12:107. Available from: https://surgicalneurologyint.com/?post_type=surgicalint_articles&p=10655

Date of Submission
01-Nov-2020

Date of Acceptance
08-Feb-2021

Date of Web Publication
17-Mar-2021

Abstract

Background: Approaches to subcortical lesions have traditionally been limited by the morbidity of white matter dissection and fixed blade retraction required to reach these targets. Visualization of deep surgical fields with a traditional operating microscope is also poor. Coordinated use of intra-operative image guidance, a tubular retractor (BrainPath®, Nico Corp, Indianapolis, Indiana), a high-definition exoscope (Vitom®, Karl Storz Endoscopy America, Inc, El Segundo, California), and a low-profile resection device (Myriad®, Nico Corp) facilitates atraumatic access to and resection of subcortical lesions including primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and intracerebral hemorrhages.[1] Use of pre-planned transsulcal and parafascicular trajectories based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can further mitigate damage to white matter tracts with this technique.

Case Description: We herein present details of the transsulcal parafascicular BrainPath®-assisted approach to subcortical lesions and demonstrate the utility of this technique using two patient examples: a spontaneous deep left posterior temporal lobe hematoma in a 41-year-old male and a left hippocampal glioblastoma in a 54-year-old female. Key steps include selection of appropriate patients with non-skull base subcortical lesions, preoperative trajectory and tube depth planning based on MRI (including diffusion-weighted imaging and DTI), patient positioning and operating room setup to facilitate pre-planned trajectories and surgeon ergonomics, and use of low-profile instruments with a two-handed surgical technique.

Conclusion: Given recent data demonstrating the utility of this approach for hematoma evacuation and a likely increased future usage of this technique,[2] surgeon familiarity with the above steps will be of increasing importance.

Keywords: Subcortical lesion, Tubular retractor, White matter tracts

Video 1

Annotations[1,2]

0:11 - Key steps in the transsulcal parafascicular brain path-assisted approach.

1:57 - Patient example #1.

2:56 - Patient example #2.

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as patients identity is not disclosed or compromised.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1. Day JD. Transsulcal parafascicular surgery using brain path® for subcortical lesions. Neurosurgery. 2017. 64: 151-6

2. Labib MA, Shah M, Kassam AB, Young R, Zucker L, Maioriello A. The safety and feasibility of image-guided brainpath-mediated transsulcul hematoma evacuation: A multicenter study. Neurosurgery. 2017. 80: 515-24

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