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Mona Stecker
  1. Department of Patient Safety, Quality and Innovation, Winthrop University Hospital, 222 Station Plaza North, Suite 408, Mineola, NY 11501, USA

Correspondence Address:
Mona Stecker
Department of Patient Safety, Quality and Innovation, Winthrop University Hospital, 222 Station Plaza North, Suite 408, Mineola, NY 11501, USA

DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.157614

Copyright: © 2015 Stecker M. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

How to cite this article: Stecker M. Inter- and intraprofessional respect: A dying concept?. Surg Neurol Int 25-May-2015;6:

How to cite this URL: Stecker M. Inter- and intraprofessional respect: A dying concept?. Surg Neurol Int 25-May-2015;6:. Available from: http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint_articles/inter%e2%80%91-intraprofessional-respect-dying-concept/

Date of Submission
11-Feb-2015

Date of Acceptance
18-Feb-2015

Date of Web Publication
25-May-2015

Much has been written in the literature involving disruptive behavior among clinicians[ 3 5 6 ] and its effects on patient safety. There are also many papers that appear in the literature discussing workplace incivility and stress among healthcare professionals.[ 2 7 ]

Unfortunately, the amount and timeliness of this literature suggests a sad fact. The problem of incivility and lack of respect in the workplace is getting worse, not better. Nurses are notorious for not respecting each other. The worn out cliché’ of “nurses eat their young” is, sadly, still relevant. Regrettably, it is not just new nurses who are treated poorly. More aggressive, more powerful nurses treat underlings, the timid, and less well-connected nurses with the same disdain as more seasoned nurses treat the less experienced.

Physicians are no innocents. The hierarchy of attending, fellow, resident, intern, is fraught with the more powerful and experienced taking advantage of those who are less so. There is also animosity between primary care and specialty providers. And we cannot forget the acrimony between specialties who display the attitude of “Those (fill-in-the-blank) docs are clueless.”

Inter-professional lack of respect, perhaps, is the worst. Physicians, largely, do not respect nurses. Nurses do not respect nursing assistants and nurses’ behavior toward nursing students is abysmal. Even nursing instructors and faculty have come under the microscope as bullying of students appear to be on the rise.[ 1 4 ]

Why is the notion of basic respect then; not only among professionals, but also among the human race, in general, so poorly adhered too? Is disrespect prevalent due to time constraints, competing priorities, or an overarching trend of narcissism in society? While the aforementioned are indicators, they are not excuses for disrespect among healthcare workers. We, as individuals, do not have much influence with respect to work flow (especially others’ work flow), nor can we immediately change the rules and regulations within a healthcare organization that causes stress to emerge. We can, however, change our behavior as members, not only as members of a profession or institution, but also as members of society. We can treat colleagues and others with respect. We can improve our listening and communication skills. We can consider new ideas, embrace new strategies and make a concentrated effort to respect individuals for the contributions they make not only in the workplace (although the workplace would be an ideal place to start) but to humankind as a whole.

References

1. Gallo VJ. Incivility in nursing education: A review of the literature. Teach Learn Nurs. 2012. 7: 62-6

2. Grenny J. Crucial Conversations: The most potent force for eliminating disruptive behavior. Crit Care Nurs Q. 2000. 32: 58-61

3. Jericho BG, Mayer D, McDonald T. Disruptive behaviors in healthcare. Internet J Anesthesiol. 2011. 28:

4. Lasiter S, Marchiondo L, Marchiondo K. Student narratives of faculty incivility. Nurs Outlook. 2011. 60: 121-6

5. Longo J. Combating disruptive behaviors: Strategies to promote a healthy work environment. Online J Issues Nurs. 2010. 15:

6. Stecker M, Epstein N, Stecker MM. Analysis of inter-provider conflicts among healthcare providers. Surg Neurol Int. 2013. 4: S375-82

7. Stecker M, Stecker MM. Disruptive staff interactions: A serious source of inter-provider conflict and stress in health care settings. Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2014. 35: 533-41

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